Building the Perfect Bay Window

Improve your homes curb appeal by upgrading your picture window to a beautiful bay window.

Your home is made up of dozens of different parts, and none have quite the same impact as your windows. On the outside they provide architectural accents which highlight your homes beauty. Inside, they provide natural light and a view to your yard. Windows can also transform a room to change how we see colors, textures, furniture, and more. These windows can change how you use a room, allowing for space for activities and many other uses depending on how much light you let in. A window provides all of these benefits and more. Expansive picture and bay windows can give both the interior and exterior of your home added dimensions, more light, and add value.

A bay window has many different benefits over a traditional picture window, specifically bay windows provide a unique view from at least three different angles. The base of a bay window also provides handy storage space for decoration or storage. As with many other aspects of home décor, bay windows come in multiple different styles and sizes. The following tips will make choosing the right bay window for your home easier and simplify the installation process.

Bay Window Styles

A standard bay with is composed of at least three windows, jointed along the edges at the factory to make a single large unit. Traditionally, bay windows comprised of a large center window which is surrounded on both sides by either narrow casement crank out windows or traditional double hung windows. The most common bay window style is an angled bay window which extends from the walls of your home at an angle between 30-degree and 45-degree angle. Furthermore, a box bay window includes a glass roof similar to a garden or greenhouse window.

Bay Window Size

A bay window comes in hundreds of sizes and styles which will be fabricated to fit any opening. Standard dimensions typically range between 3 feet to 10 feet in width and from 3 feet to 6 feet in height.

Bay Window Materials

The majority of windows in the United States and specifically the Midwest are made from either wood or vinyl. Finish and color options include primed wood, extruded vinyl and wood clad in low maintenance vinyl. While primed wood windows are on the decline, they must be painted and annual reoccurring maintenance needs to be conducted to prevent rot and window failure. Vinyl windows on the other hand are affordable and maintenance free for the life of the window.

Bay Window Glass Options

The majority of the bay windows come with insulated double pane glass separated by inert argon glass. Further energy efficient options are available with reflective low-e glass or triple panes. Homes specifically in cold weather climates such as Wisconsin want higher energy efficiency such as triple panes and argon curtains.

Bay Window Costs

The price depends heavily on the size of window as well as the functionality of the two side windows which are commonly casement or double hung windows. Without any structural modifications to your home a standard 3-foot by 6-foot bay window will likely run in the range between 900 and 1400 for the building materials alone. By hiring a window replacement contractor it’s likely to add an additional 2200 for installation and material disposal. Custom made units or modifications to the side windows can incur costs up to 15% to 20%.

Factors to Consider When Purchasing a Bay Window

Regardless of the type or style of bay window you are considering to have installed in your home, consider the following questions before buying or contracting the work out.

What Size Window?

The size of the window determines the raw material cost. Additionally, the larger the window the more material is required and the more difficult the install job. Installing a bay window that is the same size as your existing picture window will also lower your overall installation cost because it will limit the structural work required for installation. On the other hand, a large window also allows for a greater amount of sunlight to be let in and a greater visual impact both inside and outside of your home.

What Type of Window Sash?

There isn’t a set rule regarding which side windows or sashes to choose. Traditional options are double hung windows and casement windows. Honestly, pick the style that you like best. Taller narrower bay windows usually are accompanied with casement windows. Shorter units are usually paired with double hung window sashes. Ultimately, the best option is to choose something that compliments both the inside and outside of your home.

How is the Window Supported?

Bay windows need to be supported because they extend beyond the walls of your home. Typically, bay windows are supported both from above and below using steel cables.

Where to Find Your Perfect Bay Window

Window Concepts of Milwaukee